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Briefing: Fighting in South Sudan
Path to peace eludes South Sudan mediators
South Sudan: 8 key developments
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AIDS: How South Africa is beating the epidemic The spread of infection has slowed sharply and those infected are living close-to-normal lives.

Photos by Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor (Top) Children are pictured in Tshepisong Township, outside Johannesburg, South Africa. 

(Bottom left) The Sports for Social Change exercise program, sponsored by Nike, has Soweto children who have lost parents to AIDS play with those who have not to help reduce the stigma of the disease.  

An infant is cared for at Johannesburg’s Cotlands child-care facility, which has closed its hospice unit because babies undergoing AIDS treatment are no longer dying.

Graphics by Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor

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Col. Gaston Damango of the Malian army spoke with Monitor staffers on the spread of Al Qaeda in northern Mali in December, 2009. Photo by Scott Baldauf/The Christian Science Monitor
Week in Review: Catch up on the French intervention in Mali with the Monitor’s World correspondents
Europe backs French Mali mission with strong words, modest means
European backing of France appears to be holding steady after hostages were reportedly killed at a gas field in the region. But the support is a far cry from the coalition that toppled Qaddafi.
French flags selling out in Mali’s capital
France’s military intervention has been widely greeted here. Normally, Malian attitudes towards its former colonial ruler range from resentment to admiration.
France gets deeper in Mali war: Are they ready?
The recent rebel capture of the village of Diabaly renewed concerns that French air power in tandem with Malian ground forces would not be enough. Now French troops are headed north.

Col. Gaston Damango of the Malian army spoke with Monitor staffers on the spread of Al Qaeda in northern Mali in December, 2009. Photo by Scott Baldauf/The Christian Science Monitor

Week in Review: Catch up on the French intervention in Mali with the Monitor’s World correspondents

Europe backs French Mali mission with strong words, modest means

European backing of France appears to be holding steady after hostages were reportedly killed at a gas field in the region. But the support is a far cry from the coalition that toppled Qaddafi.

French flags selling out in Mali’s capital

France’s military intervention has been widely greeted here. Normally, Malian attitudes towards its former colonial ruler range from resentment to admiration.

France gets deeper in Mali war: Are they ready?

The recent rebel capture of the village of Diabaly renewed concerns that French air power in tandem with Malian ground forces would not be enough. Now French troops are headed north.

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What counts as a “megacity” by today’s UN standards? 

What counts as a “megacity” by today’s UN standards? 

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Could LRA commander’s capture help net Joseph Kony? (+video)

Captured deep in the remote Central African jungle, Ceasar Acellam is the highest-ranking Lord’s Resistance Army commander to be caught alive. Is the net closing on Joseph Kony?

(Source: csmonitor.com)

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Charles Taylor: A guilty verdict against the former Liberian president – including charges of murder, rape, use of child soldiers – sets precedent for holding sitting heads of state to account.

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Who is Joesph Koney?

What happens when the Kony 2012 campaign goes viral on Facebook and Twitter? People start looking for more information about the leader of the Lord’s Revolution Army. And a story that went largely un-noticed last October on Kony shoots to the most-read list on CSMonitor.com.

Ben Arnoldy put together a perspective piece on Kony to help people better understand the campaign against him.

Kony 2012: Campaign against African warlord goes viral, now who is he?


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Leadership: Handpicking a new generation of African role models

Set on an acre or so of land in Johannesburg’s leafy northern suburbs, his international high school – the African Leadership Academy – aims to cultivate a kind of African maverick, a problem solver who can embrace a new leadership attitude. Mr. Swaniker has identified four main attributes that leaders – at the grass-roots level all the way up to heads of state – should display: “Courage to change things, perseverance in the face of obstacles, passion, and the right values.” He’s conveying this ethic to 200 carefully chosen students – from 33 African nations – at the ALA.

READ:  Leadership: Handpicking a new generation of African role models


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"We started asking, How can we reduce the human interaction between businessmen and state workers, so we can reduce corruption? Now you can file your application online and you can pay online. That means no more bribes."

Jane Joram, senior deputy registrar general at the Company Registrar Office in Nairobi, Kenya.

READ: Kenya finds cleaner government is just a keystroke away

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The iCow mobile-phone app, invented by an organic farmer outside of Nairobi, Kenya, is just one example of the country’s growing high-tech entrepreneurial culture.