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In eastern Turkey, a rare renaissance for Middle East Christians
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The Malala Effect: 5 snapshots of girls’ education in the Muslim world

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Dispatch from our Cairo correspondent: Mubarak released: Egyptians wonder where the revolution went?
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Voices from the ‘other Egypt’ show why the country is so riven – and what its next leaders face. http://ow.ly/nyrgb

Cover story by Monitor Correspondent Kristen Chick, photography by Monitor Staff Photographer Ann Hermes, and Infographics by Rich Clabaugh.

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Egypt Update: 
The US, apparently, supports everyone in Egypt (and no one likes it)
With F-16s, Obama signals no US challenge to Egypt coup
Friends again? Saudi Arabia, UAE jump in to aid Egypt
Egypt’s coup shakes Brotherhood’s Islamic partners in Turkey
Cartoon: Dave Granlund
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Syria refugee crisis In an effort to grapple with what may become the world’s largest refugee crisis ever, the United Nations has asked for a record-breaking $5.1 billion in humanitarian aid for Syria and its neighboring countries.
The number of refugees could reach 3.5 million by the end of this year— more than 15 percent of Syria’s population. 
Graphic: Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor

Syria refugee crisis In an effort to grapple with what may become the world’s largest refugee crisis ever, the United Nations has asked for a record-breaking $5.1 billion in humanitarian aid for Syria and its neighboring countries.

The number of refugees could reach 3.5 million by the end of this year— more than 15 percent of Syria’s population. 

Graphic: Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor

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Financial Crisis in Egypt: Tough choices lie ahead in Egypt’s economic future
Bread riots or bankruptcy: Egypt faces start economic choices
For Egypt’s rich, a touch of irrational exuberance 

Financial Crisis in Egypt: Tough choices lie ahead in Egypt’s economic future

Bread riots or bankruptcy: Egypt faces start economic choices

For Egypt’s rich, a touch of irrational exuberance 

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Egypt’s Unfinished Revolution

In a special report this week, the Monitor’s Dan Murphy, staff writer and Middle East correspondent, asks whether the government of President Mohamed Morsi can survive. Murphy, who covered the 2011 Egyptian Revolution, examines what the country’s struggles mean for the region, and an Islamist political movement that seems to be on the rise. 

"As long as there is no justice, we are not going to stop protesting," Mohsen al-Domiati says. "This is going to end only when they give us [our] rights. We are eventually going to die, but we are not going alone. We’re going to take lots of them with us."

Domiati’s words are a harsh reminder to Morsi of one of the truisms of history, particularly in the modern Middle East: Taking power is one thing. Governing is something far different.

Read more:

Dan Murphy’s cover story

Ahmadinejad visits Cairo: How sect tempers Islamist ties between Egypt, Iran

In the new Egypt, the police still hew to their old torturing ways

Think you know Egypt? Test your knowledge with this quiz.

Follow Dan Murphy on Twitter @bungdan or read his blog, Backchannels, on the Monitor’s site.

Photos: (Top) A protester opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi gestures at riot police during clashes as a fire is seen at the French Lycee School along Mohamed Mahmoud street, which leads to the Interior Ministry, near Tahrir Square in Cairo, last month. Photo by: Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters

(Left) In this image released by the Egyptian Presidency, Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, (center) and Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (center r.), participate in an arrival ceremony at the airport in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 5. AP Photo

Egyptian protesters run from tear gas fired by riot police during clashes next to the presidential palace in Cairo, Friday. Photo by Khalil Hamra/AP

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Week In Review: Upheaval in EgyptBy Ariel Zirulnick, Staff writer
Unrest spread to provinces along the Suez Canal, Egypt’s economically and strategically critical waterway, prompted by locals’ anger over a court verdict passed down on Jan. 25. Residents poured into the streets in protest and clashed with police after 21 localmen were sentenced to death for their role in last year’s deadly soccer riots.
Police were completely overwhelmed by the angry crowds, and President Mohamed Morsi had to call the Egyptian Army out on the streets and declare a state of emergency. 
As Kristen Chick reported, the protests themselves were prompted by the court verdict, but long-simmering anger about their alienation from Cairo was just waiting to be touched off. 

But in the city, where initial wire reports indicated that as many as 47 people were killed and more than 1,000 injured since Jan. 26, the anger and sense of alienation from the rest of Egypt is ferocious. As anger at Mr. Morsi burns hotter with each death, Port Said exemplifies the lack of trust in state institutions that is present not just here but in much of Egypt, and the challenge Morsi faces in reasserting authority and establishing security in that environment. 
More reading on Egypt: 
Egyptians work to reclaim a Tahrir tainted by sexual assault
Egypt shudders, with leadership nowhere in sight
As Egyptians flout curfew, Army warns of ‘collapse’
Photo: Egyptians flee tear gas fired by security forces during an anti-President Mohammed Morsi protest in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Friday. Photo by: Amr Nabil/AP 

Week In Review: Upheaval in Egypt
By Staff writer

Unrest spread to provinces along the Suez Canal, Egypt’s economically and strategically critical waterway, prompted by locals’ anger over a court verdict passed down on Jan. 25. Residents poured into the streets in protest and clashed with police after 21 localmen were sentenced to death for their role in last year’s deadly soccer riots.

Police were completely overwhelmed by the angry crowds, and President Mohamed Morsi had to call the Egyptian Army out on the streets and declare a state of emergency. 

As Kristen Chick reported, the protests themselves were prompted by the court verdict, but long-simmering anger about their alienation from Cairo was just waiting to be touched off. 

But in the city, where initial wire reports indicated that as many as 47 people were killed and more than 1,000 injured since Jan. 26, the anger and sense of alienation from the rest of Egypt is ferocious. As anger at Mr. Morsi burns hotter with each death, Port Said exemplifies the lack of trust in state institutions that is present not just here but in much of Egypt, and the challenge Morsi faces in reasserting authority and establishing security in that environment. 

More reading on Egypt: 

Egyptians work to reclaim a Tahrir tainted by sexual assault

Egypt shudders, with leadership nowhere in sight

As Egyptians flout curfew, Army warns of ‘collapse’

Photo: Egyptians flee tear gas fired by security forces during an anti-President Mohammed Morsi protest in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Friday. Photo by: Amr Nabil/AP