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Polling: Behind the scenes at Gallup, interviewers and editors try to find out how Americans will vote on election day. With the media’s dependence on public opinion statistics, news consumers must educate themselves about which surveys provide valuable data and why.
READ: Polling: a look inside the machinery of public opinion surveys

Polling: Behind the scenes at Gallup, interviewers and editors try to find out how Americans will vote on election day. With the media’s dependence on public opinion statistics, news consumers must educate themselves about which surveys provide valuable data and why.

READ: Polling: a look inside the machinery of public opinion surveys

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Two graphics from this week’s focus story - “Abortion opponents have a new voice" - a profile on Charmaine Yoest from Americans United for Life. From the story:

According to a Pew Research Center for the People & the Press survey conducted in February, 54 percent of Americans believe abortion should be legal in most or all cases, while 42 percent said it should be illegal. Gallup polling has fluctuated in recent years, though the divide between Americans who self-identify as “pro-choice” versus “pro-life” has narrowed considerably since the mid-1990s when there was more than a 20 percentage-point edge among those favoring reproductive freedoms. In a 2009 Gallup poll, 51 percent of respondents said they were “pro-life” while 42 percent were “pro-choice.” But Gallup’s 2011 numbers indicate that 49 percent call themselves “pro-choice” compared with 45 percent who are “pro-life.”

Read the full story.

Two graphics from this week’s focus story - “Abortion opponents have a new voice" - a profile on Charmaine Yoest from Americans United for Life. From the story:

According to a Pew Research Center for the People & the Press survey conducted in February, 54 percent of Americans believe abortion should be legal in most or all cases, while 42 percent said it should be illegal. Gallup polling has fluctuated in recent years, though the divide between Americans who self-identify as “pro-choice” versus “pro-life” has narrowed considerably since the mid-1990s when there was more than a 20 percentage-point edge among those favoring reproductive freedoms. In a 2009 Gallup poll, 51 percent of respondents said they were “pro-life” while 42 percent were “pro-choice.” But Gallup’s 2011 numbers indicate that 49 percent call themselves “pro-choice” compared with 45 percent who are “pro-life.”

Read the full story.

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Frank Newport, editor in chief of the Gallup Poll joined the Monitor Breakfast this morning to report the latest research results. Based on frequent polling of Americans about their most important problems the national debt and deficit aren’t central in their concerns.

There is still relatively low mention of the debt and the deficit on the part of the American public. It’s the economy and jobs which are the major issue. - Frank Newport, editor in chief of the Gallup Poll

Still, a solid majority of Americans want elected officials to compromise to reach a deal to raise the national debt ceiling, which is currently set at $14.3 trillion, the USA Today/Gallup Poll out this week found. Two-thirds favored compromise, versus 27 percent who want members of Congress who share their views on the debt and budget deficit to hold out for their desired plan, the Gallup survey found. A majority of Americans of each political stripe – Republicans, independents, and Democrats – favor a compromise.
PHOTO: Courtesy Michael Bonfigli, The Christian Science Monitor

Frank Newport, editor in chief of the Gallup Poll joined the Monitor Breakfast this morning to report the latest research results. Based on frequent polling of Americans about their most important problems the national debt and deficit aren’t central in their concerns.

There is still relatively low mention of the debt and the deficit on the part of the American public. It’s the economy and jobs which are the major issue. - Frank Newport, editor in chief of the Gallup Poll

Still, a solid majority of Americans want elected officials to compromise to reach a deal to raise the national debt ceiling, which is currently set at $14.3 trillion, the USA Today/Gallup Poll out this week found. Two-thirds favored compromise, versus 27 percent who want members of Congress who share their views on the debt and budget deficit to hold out for their desired plan, the Gallup survey found. A majority of Americans of each political stripe – Republicans, independents, and Democrats – favor a compromise.

PHOTO: Courtesy Michael Bonfigli, The Christian Science Monitor

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Who was your favorite public figure in 2010?

Gallup released its annual “Most Admired” poll this week. Since the organization started surveying people about this in 1946, sitting presidents have held the No. 1 spot for men 52 times. How did President Obama fare in the 2010 ranking? Read on to learn who earned the Top 5 spots for both men and women in the Gallup poll.