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It’s a wild life!
The best of the Monitor’s animal photos from staff photographer Melanie Stetson Freeman. 
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Last week the Monitor’s Modern Parenthood blog, talked to Greg Pembroke dad/blogger and creator of Reasons My Son is Crying on unexpected internet fame, temper tantrums, parenting, and photography.
Photo courtesy Brandon Stanton/Humans of New York
For more from Modern Parenthood follow @ModParenthood

Last week the Monitor’s Modern Parenthood blog, talked to Greg Pembroke dad/blogger and creator of Reasons My Son is Crying on unexpected internet fame, temper tantrums, parenting, and photography.

Photo courtesy Brandon Stanton/Humans of New York

For more from Modern Parenthood follow @ModParenthood

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Kodak Vs. Shutterfly - threat to photo-sharing sites?

A patent dispute is unfolding between Kodak and photo-sharing site Shutterfly that could have ramifications for some of the broader photo-sharing sites on the web, such as Yahoo’s Flickr, the widely-used Picasa by Google, and Facebook’s Photos feature.

Kodak has filed a lawsuit against Shutterfly over five patents it claims Shutterfly’s online services are infringing on. Shutterfly is a popular way for people to purchase print photo books, stationery, and calendars out of their personal photos. Shutterfly has denied the claims and filed a counter-suit against Kodak over the company’s own Kodak Gallery Software.

The lawsuit could grow more complicated as Kodak prepares to sell off many of its patents, in a push avoid bankruptcy.

Kodak claims to have over 400 patents in the space and has possibly made Shutterfly its initial target because it makes for an ideal opponent — the publicly-traded Shutterfly is much bigger than a private-owned startup in the space but doesn’t have the deep pockets of giants like Google and Facebook to fully challenge such a lawsuit.

Read the full story here.

Photoset

csmphoto:

A free clinic funded by the Surmang Foundation, an American NGO, is located on the Tibetan Plateau, China. The foundation is the first foreign NGO to be registered in Quinghai Province.

Click on the photos above to see a larger version

Check out the full photo gallery on CSMonitor.com with more pictures from the clinic and surrounding area.

All photos by Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff

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gumpfl:

bless

Precious photo.

gumpfl:

bless

Precious photo.

(via alesiakaye-deactivated20140614)

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life:

This Day in History: On Aug 18, 1920 the 19th amendment was ratified allowing women the right to vote.
Pictured Above: The British feminist, seen here in 1905, co-founded the Women’s Social and Political Union, the U.K.’s leading suffragette organization, in 1903.
Girl power y’all — Civil Rights: Beyond Black & White

life:

This Day in History: On Aug 18, 1920 the 19th amendment was ratified allowing women the right to vote.

Pictured Above: The British feminist, seen here in 1905, co-founded the Women’s Social and Political Union, the U.K.’s leading suffragette organization, in 1903.

Girl power y’all Civil Rights: Beyond Black & White

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csmphoto:

Monitor photographers have been visiting the continent of Africa for decades.  Next week the Christian Science Monitor weekly magazine will feature Africa and the myths that we hold about this very complex continent. 

I was very excited to revisit the work we have done in the last decade and give it a new outlet.  For better or for worse, many of these works are as relevant today as they were when we produced them.  One of the things that I do not like about photojournalism, is that our work seems so perishable.  We put our heart and soul into stories, work insane hours, just to see it pushed aside by the new story of the day.  In many ways, I wish to go back to the stories, when the world has moved on to the new “crisis du jour”, and take a deep look at people and the great stories that develop with time.  I think of places like Haiti, where the world focused so much right after the earthquake.   Now we all pretend/expect/wish that things are OK. But are we looking?

I hope you enjoy this preview of what’s to come next week.
Alfredo Sosa - Director of Photography & Multimedia

csmphoto:

Monitor photographers have been visiting the continent of Africa for decades.  Next week the Christian Science Monitor weekly magazine will feature Africa and the myths that we hold about this very complex continent. 

I was very excited to revisit the work we have done in the last decade and give it a new outlet.  For better or for worse, many of these works are as relevant today as they were when we produced them.  One of the things that I do not like about photojournalism, is that our work seems so perishable.  We put our heart and soul into stories, work insane hours, just to see it pushed aside by the new story of the day.  In many ways, I wish to go back to the stories, when the world has moved on to the new “crisis du jour”, and take a deep look at people and the great stories that develop with time.  I think of places like Haiti, where the world focused so much right after the earthquake.   Now we all pretend/expect/wish that things are OK. But are we looking?

I hope you enjoy this preview of what’s to come next week.

Alfredo Sosa - Director of Photography & Multimedia

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Yes, you’re right, that is a Ducati. 

Ducati MotoGP rider Rossi of Italy rides during free practice for German Grand Prix at the Sachsenring circuit. 

Photo by: TOBIAS SCHWARZ/Reuters

Yes, you’re right, that is a Ducati. 

Ducati MotoGP rider Rossi of Italy rides during free practice for German Grand Prix at the Sachsenring circuit.

Photo by: TOBIAS SCHWARZ/Reuters

(Source: csmonitor.com)

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futurejournalismproject:

Last February, the English photographer Giles Duley stepped on a land mine in Afghanistan while covering an American infantry patrol.
Via the New York Times:

“I remember looking up and seeing bits of me and my clothes in the tree, which I knew wasn’t a good sign,” he said. “I saw my left arm. It was just obviously shredded to pieces, and smoldering. I couldn’t feel my legs, so straightaway and from what I could see in the tree, I figured they were gone.”
Mr. Duley had become, in that flash, a triple amputee. Now he risked swiftly bleeding to death. He recalled uttering a single word: “bollocks.”
As the American soldiers he had been walking with rushed toward him and began tightening the tourniquets that would save his life, a fuller line of thought took flight. Rather than tally what was missing, Mr. Duley counted what remained.
“I thought, ‘Right hand? Eyes?’ ” — he realized that all of these were intact — “and I thought, ‘I can work.’”

CJ Chivers, The New York Times. Bomb Took 3 Limbs but not Photographer’s Can-Do Spirit.

Amazing story. We had to share it.

futurejournalismproject:

Last February, the English photographer Giles Duley stepped on a land mine in Afghanistan while covering an American infantry patrol.

Via the New York Times:

“I remember looking up and seeing bits of me and my clothes in the tree, which I knew wasn’t a good sign,” he said. “I saw my left arm. It was just obviously shredded to pieces, and smoldering. I couldn’t feel my legs, so straightaway and from what I could see in the tree, I figured they were gone.”

Mr. Duley had become, in that flash, a triple amputee. Now he risked swiftly bleeding to death. He recalled uttering a single word: “bollocks.”

As the American soldiers he had been walking with rushed toward him and began tightening the tourniquets that would save his life, a fuller line of thought took flight. Rather than tally what was missing, Mr. Duley counted what remained.

I thought, ‘Right hand? Eyes?’ ” — he realized that all of these were intact — “and I thought, ‘I can work.’

CJ Chivers, The New York Times. Bomb Took 3 Limbs but not Photographer’s Can-Do Spirit.

Amazing story. We had to share it.

(Source: csmonitor.com, via futurejournalismproject)

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Did someone bring the wrong pair of shoes to the party? Earlier I wondered if the Duchess of Cambridge was thinking “flats instead of pumps?” We doubt it. But a great photo by Reuters’ photographer Andy Clark nonetheless.

Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, greets tradition dancers during a visit to the Somba K’e Civic Plaza with her husband, Britain’s Prince William, in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories on July 5, 2011. Prince William and his wife Catherine are on a royal tour of Canada from June 30 to July 8.

Did someone bring the wrong pair of shoes to the party? Earlier I wondered if the Duchess of Cambridge was thinking “flats instead of pumps?” We doubt it. But a great photo by Reuters’ photographer Andy Clark nonetheless.

Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, greets tradition dancers during a visit to the Somba K’e Civic Plaza with her husband, Britain’s Prince William, in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories on July 5, 2011. Prince William and his wife Catherine are on a royal tour of Canada from June 30 to July 8.

(Source: csmonitor.com)