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The radio show Here & Now, produced for NPR by WBUR in Boston interviewed our very own Scott Baldauf for yesterday’s show. It is based on his piece Five Myths About Africa printed earlier this year. 

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PHOTO: Ham radio enthusiast David Drummond’s gear runs from modern to vintage. (Ann Hermes/ CSMonitor Staff)

Ham radio, of course – the noncommercial use of certain radio bands – should be long since dead. It should have been replaced by the rise of the Internet or Facebook. It should have been killed by Twitter, which also allows users to communicate instantly across vast distances. But in towns across the country, hundreds of groups, such as the Tuscaloosa Amateur Radio Club, have soldiered on, hunkering down in basement offices and sending audio messages off into the ether. They have diligently recruited new members and shared their love of the pastime through community events and newsletters. And far from being made obsolete by the Web, hams have used it to create thousands of online message boards and specialty sites. - Matt Shaer, reporter

Ham radio is alive and kicking, a persevering art form from the past making its way in the digital age. Read Matt’s full account here.

PHOTO: Ham radio enthusiast David Drummond’s gear runs from modern to vintage. (Ann Hermes/ CSMonitor Staff)

Ham radio, of course – the noncommercial use of certain radio bands – should be long since dead. It should have been replaced by the rise of the Internet or Facebook. It should have been killed by Twitter, which also allows users to communicate instantly across vast distances. But in towns across the country, hundreds of groups, such as the Tuscaloosa Amateur Radio Club, have soldiered on, hunkering down in basement offices and sending audio messages off into the ether. They have diligently recruited new members and shared their love of the pastime through community events and newsletters. And far from being made obsolete by the Web, hams have used it to create thousands of online message boards and specialty sites. - Matt Shaer, reporter

Ham radio is alive and kicking, a persevering art form from the past making its way in the digital age. Read Matt’s full account here.