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Best of the Blogs: Energy Voices
By David J. Unger, Correspondent 
The Monitor’s Energy Voices covers the power dynamics of a growing world. As resource consumption increases globally, how will we fuel our cars, heat our homes and power our phones? From Keystone to hybrids to solar to shale, Energy Voices is a resource for understanding energy and its nexus with the environment. 
Photos: 
(Top) An Exxon logo is shown at a Dallas gas station. Photo by: LM Otero
 
(Left) Aubrey McClendon, president and chief executive officer of Chesapeake Energy. Photo by: Sean Gardner/Reuters
 
John Kerry sits before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee as he seeks confirmation as US secretary of State, on Capitol Hill in Washington last week. Photo by: J. Scott Applewhite
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The Apple Store in Boston, Mass., Sept. 2011. Photo by: Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor  
Innovation and Tech: This week’s latest smart phone news
iPhone 6: Fingerprint sensor included?
Google ‘X-Phone’ ready to blossom this spring: reports
Facebook zooms past Google Maps to become the most used phone app in the US

The Apple Store in Boston, Mass., Sept. 2011. Photo by: Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor  

Innovation and Tech: This week’s latest smart phone news

iPhone 6: Fingerprint sensor included?

Google ‘X-Phone’ ready to blossom this spring: reports

Facebook zooms past Google Maps to become the most used phone app in the US

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Miranda Ventura, 11, plays games on her Apple iPod Touch device in her bedroom in Santa Clara, California, in 2011. Photo by Tony Avelar/The Christian Science Monitor
New Year, New Devices: The latest news on all things Apple and Android, and an update on broadband on planes from the Monitor’s Innovation team
A very techy Christmas: 50 million new phones and tablets activated
Christmas week saw a record 50 million iOS and Android devices activated, and more than 1.7 billion apps downloaded, according to analytics firm Flurry. On Christmas Day alone 17.4 million new devices were unwrapped.
Next Mac Mini might be ‘Made in USA’
Apple CEO Tim Cook said earlier in December that the company would produce some Mac computers in the US in 2013, but he didn’t say which ones. A new rumor from Taiwanese tech magazine DigiTimes says the Mac Mini will be moved stateside.
FCC paves the way for better in-flight broadband
The FCC approved new rules on Friday that will make it easier for companies to offer broadband Internet on airplanes. The FCC has authorized in-flight Internet on an ad hoc basis since 2001, but the new rules will provide a framework for licensing companies to provide it.

Miranda Ventura, 11, plays games on her Apple iPod Touch device in her bedroom in Santa Clara, California, in 2011. Photo by Tony Avelar/The Christian Science Monitor

New Year, New Devices: The latest news on all things Apple and Android, and an update on broadband on planes from the Monitor’s Innovation team

A very techy Christmas: 50 million new phones and tablets activated

Christmas week saw a record 50 million iOS and Android devices activated, and more than 1.7 billion apps downloaded, according to analytics firm Flurry. On Christmas Day alone 17.4 million new devices were unwrapped.

Next Mac Mini might be ‘Made in USA’

Apple CEO Tim Cook said earlier in December that the company would produce some Mac computers in the US in 2013, but he didn’t say which ones. A new rumor from Taiwanese tech magazine DigiTimes says the Mac Mini will be moved stateside.

FCC paves the way for better in-flight broadband

The FCC approved new rules on Friday that will make it easier for companies to offer broadband Internet on airplanes. The FCC has authorized in-flight Internet on an ad hoc basis since 2001, but the new rules will provide a framework for licensing companies to provide it.

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Thanks Joe Heller for this cartoon.

Thanks Joe Heller for this cartoon.

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"Do simple things well. It sounds easy, but it’s really hard. Get rid of dysfunctional politics. You can see how that has tormented large American companies, like the auto industry. Let outliers into your organization; welcome diversity. The fact is, Steve Jobs couldn’t get hired in most American companies, much less be the CEO. He couldn’t pass through the interview screens. Stay curious. Cultivate peripheral vision in your organization. Learn how to reframe your own offerings by looking both broadly and deeply across other industries. Recognize what you don’t know and find others who know more than you. Build a team at the top that has real power and talent. And don’t underestimate the power of strong cultural control. Find a way to create the old-fashioned unity of purpose."

- Stanford Professor Bob Sutton talks about the practical business lessons exuded by Apple and Steve Jobs. Excerpt from our recent cover story “The Apple Effect: How Steve Jobs & Co. won over the world.”

You can read the full story and our tribute to Steve Jobs.

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washingtonpoststyle:

Obituary | Photos | Reaction | Tributes | Apple’s new challenges | In his own words | How Jobs taught us to let go 
Graphic by Tom Christmann
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Steve Jobs with the Apple II in 1977 (AP/File) 
READ: The Apple Effect
GALLERY: How Apple won the world

Steve Jobs with the Apple II in 1977 (AP/File) 

READ: The Apple Effect

GALLERY: How Apple won the world

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"And then there’s Apple. It’s amazingly centralized and nontransparent, not from the outside and not even from the inside. In some ways, Apple has thrived because it’s a contrary organization. It’s centralized, but the pieces all fit together. Information does come up from the bottom and reaches the top. There’s very strong punishment and reward control. It has a narrow product line, so the focus is clear and management isn’t overloaded."

Stanford Professor Bob Sutton, on the structure of Apple that defies many business norms. 

READ: The Apple Effect 

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nationalpost:

Graphic: Apple Inc.’s bushels of cash
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