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America’s new isolationism Weary of war, Americans increasingly balk at military intervention. Does this reflect a new strain of isolationism or just doubts about the effectiveness of using force in the Middle East?
Graphs: John Kehe/The Christian Science Monitor

America’s new isolationism Weary of war, Americans increasingly balk at military intervention. Does this reflect a new strain of isolationism or just doubts about the effectiveness of using force in the Middle East?

Graphs: John Kehe/The Christian Science Monitor

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Can Europe shoulder its military burden on its own? 
As Britain’s military shrinks, US concerns grow
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Seoul Power: South Korea, long in the shadow of other Asian ‘tiger economies,’ is suddenly hip and enormously prosperous – so much so that it may have outgrown its thankless dream of reuniting with the North

Photos: (Top) Wonder Boyz bank member ‘K’ practices dance moves at a Gangnam studio. Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor 

A young woman chats on a cellphone at a cafe in the Gangnam district, which sits on the south bank of the Han River, and is the epicenter of K-Pop. Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor

Graphics: Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor

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Week in Review: President Obama travels to the Middle East
Obama and Netanyahu: In Israel, a show of warmth as region heats up
Will Obama’s visit help ‘turn the page’ for Israel and the Palestinians?
As Obama does about-face on settlements, Palestinians question US as ‘honest broker’
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Week in Review: Iran, the nuclear threatBy Ariel Zirulnick, Staff writer 
This week the United Nations nuclear agency inspectors concluded a one-day visit to Tehran without a solution for restarting stalled inspections of Iran’s nuclear facilities and without concrete plans for another meeting to discuss a deal.
The team from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) most immediately seeks access to the Parchin military complex outside Tehran, where Iran is suspected by the IAEA to be working toward nuclear weapon capability, but left with no guarantees it would be allowed to do so.
Iran’s nuclear program has been surrounded by mixed signals in recent weeks. As the Monitor’s Scott Peterson reported, Iran has taken a number of steps lately that seem to indicate it is slowing down its nuclear progress, possibly to avoid reaching the point at which Israel would feel compelled to retaliate. It has converted some of its higher-grade enriched uranium into reactor fuel, taking it out of the mix for use in potential nuclear weapons, and seems to have made no strides forward in its development of longer-range weapons that could carry a nuclear warhead.
Read more on Iran’s nuclear program and the country’s controversial leader: 
One step forward, one step back on Iran’s nuclear program
Why the Iran threat assessment may be easing - for now
Is Iran’s Ahmadinejad going rogue as his term ends?
Photo by: Hasan Sarbakhshian/Associated Press. An anti-aircraft gun position is seen at Iran’s nuclear enrichment facility in Natanz, Iran, in this September 2007 photo.

Week in Review: Iran, the nuclear threat
By Ariel ZirulnickStaff writer 

This week the United Nations nuclear agency inspectors concluded a one-day visit to Tehran without a solution for restarting stalled inspections of Iran’s nuclear facilities and without concrete plans for another meeting to discuss a deal.

The team from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) most immediately seeks access to the Parchin military complex outside Tehran, where Iran is suspected by the IAEA to be working toward nuclear weapon capability, but left with no guarantees it would be allowed to do so.

Iran’s nuclear program has been surrounded by mixed signals in recent weeks. As the Monitor’s Scott Peterson reported, Iran has taken a number of steps lately that seem to indicate it is slowing down its nuclear progress, possibly to avoid reaching the point at which Israel would feel compelled to retaliate. It has converted some of its higher-grade enriched uranium into reactor fuel, taking it out of the mix for use in potential nuclear weapons, and seems to have made no strides forward in its development of longer-range weapons that could carry a nuclear warhead.

Read more on Iran’s nuclear program and the country’s controversial leader: 

One step forward, one step back on Iran’s nuclear program

Why the Iran threat assessment may be easing - for now

Is Iran’s Ahmadinejad going rogue as his term ends?

Photo by: Hasan Sarbakhshian/Associated Press. An anti-aircraft gun position is seen at Iran’s nuclear enrichment facility in Natanz, Iran, in this September 2007 photo.

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Egypt’s Unfinished Revolution

In a special report this week, the Monitor’s Dan Murphy, staff writer and Middle East correspondent, asks whether the government of President Mohamed Morsi can survive. Murphy, who covered the 2011 Egyptian Revolution, examines what the country’s struggles mean for the region, and an Islamist political movement that seems to be on the rise. 

"As long as there is no justice, we are not going to stop protesting," Mohsen al-Domiati says. "This is going to end only when they give us [our] rights. We are eventually going to die, but we are not going alone. We’re going to take lots of them with us."

Domiati’s words are a harsh reminder to Morsi of one of the truisms of history, particularly in the modern Middle East: Taking power is one thing. Governing is something far different.

Read more:

Dan Murphy’s cover story

Ahmadinejad visits Cairo: How sect tempers Islamist ties between Egypt, Iran

In the new Egypt, the police still hew to their old torturing ways

Think you know Egypt? Test your knowledge with this quiz.

Follow Dan Murphy on Twitter @bungdan or read his blog, Backchannels, on the Monitor’s site.

Photos: (Top) A protester opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi gestures at riot police during clashes as a fire is seen at the French Lycee School along Mohamed Mahmoud street, which leads to the Interior Ministry, near Tahrir Square in Cairo, last month. Photo by: Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters

(Left) In this image released by the Egyptian Presidency, Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, (center) and Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (center r.), participate in an arrival ceremony at the airport in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 5. AP Photo

Egyptian protesters run from tear gas fired by riot police during clashes next to the presidential palace in Cairo, Friday. Photo by Khalil Hamra/AP

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Foreign Policy, The Guardian, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Washington Post and New York Times are included in today’s Good Reads top stories roundup from the international desk.