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Can long-term unemployed find work in improving US economy? There’s hope.
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Recovery from the Great Recession: How far have we come? 
Graphic: Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor Research: Mark Trumbull and Allison Terry

Recovery from the Great Recession: How far have we come? 

Graphic: Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor Research: Mark Trumbull and Allison Terry

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5 lessons of the Great Recession
Graphic: Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor

5 lessons of the Great Recession

Graphic: Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor

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Graphic by Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor
Where are the New Jobs? This week, a special series examines the fastest-growing fields in the U.S., developing trends that could help your career, and how to identify tomorrow’s hubs of innovation.

10 surprises about tomorrow’s job market
Four trends that could help your career in 2013
Where the next Silicon Valleys might be
Why sales is a hot new job
The newest app? Creating jobs.

Graphic by Rich Clabaugh/The Christian Science Monitor

Where are the New Jobs? This week, a special series examines the fastest-growing fields in the U.S., developing trends that could help your career, and how to identify tomorrow’s hubs of innovation.

10 surprises about tomorrow’s job market

Four trends that could help your career in 2013

Where the next Silicon Valleys might be

Why sales is a hot new job

The newest app? Creating jobs.

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This is Rosa Finnegan, age 100, who works at a Boston area needle factory (Photo by Melanie Stetson Freeman/STAFF). 
Rosa is featured in this week’s cover story - highlighting seniors working past retirement and the companies that hire them. Find the full story here. 

This is Rosa Finnegan, age 100, who works at a Boston area needle factory (Photo by Melanie Stetson Freeman/STAFF). 

Rosa is featured in this week’s cover story - highlighting seniors working past retirement and the companies that hire them. Find the full story here

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The percentage of mothers in the workforce is nearing record highs, leading to more societal acceptance and childcare options, but mothers still face a ‘mommy wage gap’ and other challenges.

READ: Share of working moms nearing all-time high, but has it gotten any easier?

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From this week’s cover story: The job-shifters: people who reinvent themselves mid-career
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The 10 Happiest Jobs

Since we rained on everyone’s Labor Day parade with our story Six Reasons why America can’t create jobs, we did also want to share a list of The 10 Happiest Jobs. Enjoy. 

Tags: Economy Jobs
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"I said to him ‘Do not look at what is possible. Look at what is necessary.’ The American public wants solutions…. If he falls into the nibbling around the edge, I think history will judge him by that, and I think working people will judge him by that."

— Richard Trumka, President of the AFL-CIO at The Monitor Breakfast in DC this morning, talking about a conversation with President Obama.

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Frank Newport, editor in chief of the Gallup Poll joined the Monitor Breakfast this morning to report the latest research results. Based on frequent polling of Americans about their most important problems the national debt and deficit aren’t central in their concerns.

There is still relatively low mention of the debt and the deficit on the part of the American public. It’s the economy and jobs which are the major issue. - Frank Newport, editor in chief of the Gallup Poll

Still, a solid majority of Americans want elected officials to compromise to reach a deal to raise the national debt ceiling, which is currently set at $14.3 trillion, the USA Today/Gallup Poll out this week found. Two-thirds favored compromise, versus 27 percent who want members of Congress who share their views on the debt and budget deficit to hold out for their desired plan, the Gallup survey found. A majority of Americans of each political stripe – Republicans, independents, and Democrats – favor a compromise.
PHOTO: Courtesy Michael Bonfigli, The Christian Science Monitor

Frank Newport, editor in chief of the Gallup Poll joined the Monitor Breakfast this morning to report the latest research results. Based on frequent polling of Americans about their most important problems the national debt and deficit aren’t central in their concerns.

There is still relatively low mention of the debt and the deficit on the part of the American public. It’s the economy and jobs which are the major issue. - Frank Newport, editor in chief of the Gallup Poll

Still, a solid majority of Americans want elected officials to compromise to reach a deal to raise the national debt ceiling, which is currently set at $14.3 trillion, the USA Today/Gallup Poll out this week found. Two-thirds favored compromise, versus 27 percent who want members of Congress who share their views on the debt and budget deficit to hold out for their desired plan, the Gallup survey found. A majority of Americans of each political stripe – Republicans, independents, and Democrats – favor a compromise.

PHOTO: Courtesy Michael Bonfigli, The Christian Science Monitor